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Safety on Trains

Sheree Bishop, Page Editor

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Concern about whether or not it’s safe to ride BART

The efficiency and reliability of BART is what has kept it as an important form of transportation for over four decades. As the population of the Bay Area grows, BART continues to work on its nearly 50 year old infrastructure as well as attempting to maintain the safety of its passengers.

According to performance measurements on bart.gov (presented in June 2018), electronic item thefts and cases of assault and battery on bart have increased since February 2018. From 2013 to 2018, the subtotal of reported crimes on BART has seen no change, for better or worse. The general lack of safety on BART has been leading many riders to believe they are better off finding another way to get around.

“I felt fairly safe on BART just because I was only riding it by myself when there weren’t many people,” said Julia Tikhonov (‘21)

As of the time of publishing, BART seems to have safety measures centered around passenger initiative. For example, the BART watch app, which allows users to send a private text to the BART police in case of an emergency. BART also has tips for passengers, posted both on their website and in train cars:

  • Be aware of surroundings and avoid looking distracted, especially while standing near stairs, escalators, and train doors and anywhere suspects can make a quick exit.
  • Don’t sleep on board train cars.
  • The Train Operator is in the first train car; it’s a great place to sit if you are traveling alone.

    The Bay Area’s Bart Transportation Train is used daily by commuters due to its easy accessibility as well as students for city trips; however, some worry about its lack, there-of, of safety measures.

  • If something makes you feel uncomfortable, move to another train car.
  • Avoid getting pickpocketed, purses that zip closed are a good option in crowded places.

“I honestly haven’t done enough research on their police but after the Nia Wilson incident it seems like they need to improve safety, that incident did effect how safe I felt on BART,” said Julia Tikhonov (‘21).

 Most people would argue that these tips are obvious, if not common knowledge for anyone who cares about not having their things stolen. And though the BART does have an established police force it doesn’t seem as though anything is being done to actively deter crime or keep people safe on BART.

 

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Safety on Trains