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AmadorValleyToday

The student news site of Amador Valley High School

AmadorValleyToday

The student news site of Amador Valley High School

AmadorValleyToday

Local artists promote water conservation through unique street murals

Painted+along+the+streets+of+Dublin%2C+storm+drain+art+is+one+of+the+many+ways+the+city+is+making+an+effort+to+promote+water+conservation.
Painted along the streets of Dublin, storm drain art is one of the many ways the city is making an effort to promote water conservation.

Dublin is now embracing an innovative approach to both art and environmental consciousness through storm drain artwork. These typically overlooked and utilitarian structures have been transformed into canvases for stunning murals, promoting water conservation and raising awareness about the importance of protecting the city’s waterways.

Along the streets of Dublin, where pedestrians hustle by without a second glance, colorful murals now adorn storm drains, captivating the attention of passersby. These artworks, often depicting marine life, water droplets, or messages urging water preservation, serve as a message to improve water quality locally.

The Artists

Local artists, such as Rhonda Chase and Chih Chun Eroles, have lent their talents to this initiative, infusing the streets with their creativity and passion for environmental activism.

Chase, known for her vibrant and thought-provoking pieces, believes that art has the power to spark conversations and bring communities together.

“While physically taxing, I found I loved working directly in the community and creating art for residents while they watched my progress. When the storm drain sidewalk “murals” project came up I thought they would be fun. Also, it appealed to my eco-conscience as I’ve always been a strong environmental advocate” said Chase.

Similarly, for artist Eroles, she also believes that art can be profoundly impactful.

“Incorporating water conservation themes into my artwork allows me to engage with the community on a deeper level,” Eroles shares. “Art has the ability to transcend language barriers and communicate complex issues in a visually compelling way.”

The Art

Chase’s murals, situated near Wells Middle School, depict matching otters splashing in water.

“Even before the project came up I had a plan to do some sea otter artwork. The combination of following otter #841 and a visit to Monterey reminded me how much I love these marine mammals,” said Chase. “When it came time to send in my storm drain proposal I adapted my ideas for that project. I liked the idea of reminding people that our water drains to the creeks and Bay, and what (or who!) is already living there.”

Similarly, Eroles’ artwork focuses on the beauty of nature and the urgency of preserving it for future generations. Her mural showcases two hands holding a single drop of water encasing the Earth. The statement “The Future of the Ocean is In Your hands” surrounds the globe.

“Through art, we have the opportunity to instill a sense of stewardship and responsibility towards our environment.I intend to acentuate the importance of our collective effort as ech of us is like one drop of water in a bigger community” said Eroles.

Painting on the ground in the hot sun was difficult but Chase found ways around it.

“The actual painting was a little tricky. I needed a block of dry days, and also wanted to work around the Dublin school schedule since I was painting in front of a middle school. I ended up working in socks and playing Art Painting Twister, keeping my feet in small unpainted spots while balancing paint in one hand, and using my brush with the other to avoid stepping on my own work” said Chase.

Impact

Specifically, Chase’s painting being in front of Wells Middle School added a whole new meaning to her work, making ripple waves of influence on the young kids on the importance of conserving water.

“I really hope the neighborhood and kids at the school enjoy the paintings. I also hope the murals are a practical reminder not to put pollutants into the drains. And to more generally care for your natural environment,” said Chase.

 

 

 

 

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