Disappointing silence on 9/11

The+new+memorial+building%2C+One+World+Trade+Center%2C+is+the+main+building+of+the+rebuilt+World+Trade+Center+complex+in+Lower+Manhattan.+It+has+104+floors+and+it+opened+on+Nov+3%2C+2014.+It+is+the+tallest+building+in+the+Western+Hemisphere%2C+and+the+sixth-tallest+in+the+world.
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Disappointing silence on 9/11

The new memorial building, One World Trade Center, is the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan. It has 104 floors and it opened on Nov 3, 2014. It is the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest in the world.

The new memorial building, One World Trade Center, is the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan. It has 104 floors and it opened on Nov 3, 2014. It is the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest in the world.

Elizabeth Kostalnick

The new memorial building, One World Trade Center, is the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan. It has 104 floors and it opened on Nov 3, 2014. It is the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest in the world.

Elizabeth Kostalnick

Elizabeth Kostalnick

The new memorial building, One World Trade Center, is the main building of the rebuilt World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan. It has 104 floors and it opened on Nov 3, 2014. It is the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, and the sixth-tallest in the world.

Elizabeth Kostalnick, Staff Writer

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    On September 11, 2001, terror wreaked havoc on the east coast of the United states. Four hijacked planes crashed into buildings full of people. This was the greatest attack on the U.S. mainland in recent history.

    Surprisingly, on the anniversary of 9/11 this year, there was little to no mention of the events we have been told to “Never forget” at Amador Valley High School, as well as many other schools in the Bay Area.

    In the article, Teachers ‘scared’ to teach lessons on 9/11 terror attack, The Telegraph Education Editor Camilla Turner interviewed multiple teachers about teaching the topic.  In her interviews she was told that, “some teachers – particularly those who work in schools with a high proportion of Muslim students –  see it [9/11] as a contentious topic and shy away from teaching it.”

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TV news audiences watched in horror as the second plane hit the tower and erupted in a giant fireball live on their screens.

In the past, at Amador, there has been many references to 9/11 with a commemoration of the day in history classes. However, many teachers at Amador Valley did not mention anything about 9/11 last Monday, and there was no moment of silence either.

    “ I was surprised that [my history teacher] actually didn’t mention it, and I was surprised because he normally talks about current events and addresses them, and even events that have happened in the past, like 9/11 and how that affected our government,” said Bridget Steele (‘18).

    Steele was one of many students at Amador Valley who did not hear mention of the day’s significance in her classes.

    “We had a sub that day, and I honestly didn’t know that it was 9/11 until we got home from school and my mom told me because no one confronted it. I didn’t hear about it at all that whole day,” said Jenna Tibidoh (‘20).

    However, some teachers did briefly talk about the significance of 9/11.

    English teacher, Stacey Sklar, was one of the few teachers who had a whole lesson for around 9/11.

    “[9/11] is actually part of our new freshmen curriculum.  The first unit is about what it means to be an American, and there is an article entitled “Quilt of a Country,” which addresses issues of difference and unity following the 9/11 attacks. I showed short clips from the History channel about the day and what it meant to people, and then launched into a discussion about the article with students,” said Sklar.

Some students were surprised that their teachers did not bring the topic up.

“Well, my biology teacher actually brought it up after history, so it was kind of interesting to see how she brought it up and my history teacher didn’t bring it up at all. In 8th grade we did like a whole period on it and now it’s not really recognized anymore,” said Annika Sodergren (‘20).

    Currently at Amador, only seniors and juniors were alive during the event, which may be a reason why it is no longer discussed at school.

    In San Ramon, at Cal High,  Amir Udler (’18), decided to put on an assembly after school in commemoration of the attacks.

    “We have so many textbooks, and smaller class sizes to accommodate everyone, but we can’t even take a moment of silence for those who were murdered on that day,” Udler.

    Udler’s view on not having a single mention of the anniversary was similar to many here at Amador.

    “We’ve actually never had that (a moment of silence) at Amador and this has been my fourth year here. But, I’m not sure why. It hasn’t been a tradition here, I believe the history teachers observe it in some way in the classroom, because that’s an appropriate place to have it be observed, but it has never been done here, and I don’t know why that is,” said  Nimarta Grewal, Vice Principal.

    With the last two classes of students who were alive during the terrorist attack graduating in the next two years, and many more  students who were not alive during that time taking their place, many students told us that they think it is important for us to now, more than ever, come together and continue to “never forget” the events of September 11, 2001.

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