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A New Way to Shoot

Andrew+McGinty+%28%2718%29+and+Allison+O%27Yang+%28%2718%29+show+off+their+newly+made+cardboard+cameras
Andrew McGinty ('18) and Allison O'Yang ('18) show off their newly made cardboard cameras

Andrew McGinty ('18) and Allison O'Yang ('18) show off their newly made cardboard cameras

Andrew McGinty ('18) and Allison O'Yang ('18) show off their newly made cardboard cameras

Haley LaHa, Page Editor

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    New photography teacher, Mrs. Fisher, has put a spin on the art science of taking photos. For the first two weeks of school, she has instructed her students not just how to use a camera, but how to make one.

    With the help of a template, students were given pieces of cardboard, a box cutting knife, black electrical tape, and a single piece of foil to fashion a light-proof box that could be utilized as a manual camera.

    “Photography is a very simple concept. If we start with a lot of expensive equipment and fancy lenses, we lose the idea of how light is actually working and affecting things. I wanted to go back to super basic so we remember what’s the simple concept of photography and how light is working,” explained Mrs. Fisher.

    To take photos with these handmade cameras, students use photo paper as they would to develop film from a film camera. After light exposure through a small pinhole in the box, the photo can be developed in the darkroom through the same process after one would develop a picture from film.

    “I think [taking pictures with the cardboard camera] is really fun because it’s a good way to learn how cameras actually work, even though it is kind of hard and takes a good amount of work,” said Drew McGinty (‘18).

    This project has put a profound twist on taking photos and seems to be changing the perspectives of many students in how they view the art of photography.

    “Building the box camera correctly was much harder than I expected. It takes a lot of time and effort, but it really makes you appreciate the creative process,” stated Trevor Wallace (‘18).

    Through completing this project Mrs. Fisher encourages her students to “keep it simple, keep it real, and to keep looking around at the world.”

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A New Way to Shoot